BBC Stacey Dooley Investigates Fashions Dirty Secrets HD

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  • #4104

    Nana
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    [Here’s a link to those of you’d like to give it a watch](https://youtu.be/-S6CPu8yYrg)

    Quick summary: In this documentary Stacey Dooley investigates the environmental impacts of the fashion industry, specifically the use and pollution of water. In one part of the documentary she visits the site of what was once the [Aral Sea](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aral_Sea) and explores the impacts that the loss of the sea has had on local communities. Dooley also visits Indonesia’s [Citarum River](https://pulitzercenter.org/reporting/death-citarum-river-indonesias-most-toxic-waterway) and sees firsthand how textile manufactures are dumping toxic chemicals into the river with little to no governmental oversight. Throughout the film Dooley reaches out to fashion’s largest retailers and, unsurprisingly, they all decline to comment, even when approached at a conference centered around sustainability. Influencers are brought in toward the end of the film and shown clips of what Dooley has seen and shown a sample of the water taken from the Citarum River. As a result of what they’ve seen the Dooley and the influencers posit that consumer knowledge about these practices and changes to shopping habits will help address the issue.

    My thoughts: As someone who has seen *The True Cost*, this film has helped reinforce what I already knew and pushed me to address my personal shopping habits again. The images of an entire sea being absorbed by cotton production and a polluted river that was at some points colored black and steaming definitely brought the message home. The issues I have are with the solution posed at end of the documentary. The idea that consideration for the environment is the responsibility of the lone consumer rather than the billion-dollar corporation or elected official in a position of power shifts the blame and fails to address the reality of the situation. Transparency about production practices is not the responsibility of consumers and Dooley’s inability to speak with any of the brands she contacted shows how we, as consumers, wont get any answers or accountability from brands. It is very clear that these corporations know that what they’re doing is wrong, otherwise they would not be going to such great lengths to hide their connections to the outside contractors that engage in these harmful practices.

    #4105

    tegmariee

    I literally just watched this. Now I’m watching The True Cost on Netflix.

    #4106

    DrMcFacekick

    “The idea that consideration for the environment is the responsibility of the lone consumer rather than the billion-dollar corporation or elected official in a position of power shifts the blame and fails to address the reality of the situation.”

    I don’t think it’s about saying the consumer is solely responsible, it’s about encouraging us to vote with our wallet. If enough individual consumers stop buying from the corporations that are condoning these practices, then the corporations will have to pivot their business in order to stay profitable.

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